Welcome to the better presentations blog!

I do my best to make this blog a resource for presenters - not pro-speakers, but real people who need to make presentations as part of their 'day job'. If there's something you really want to know about, just email me and I'll see what I can do (no promises except that I'll read your email - use simon@ and you can guess the rest of my address. :) )

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Simon, presenting at a conference

I wasn’t the most impressive presenter at the conference

I while ago I presented at a big multi-speaker conference, and the speakers got compared… it’s inevitable in a way, I suppose. It wasn’t the speakers who were comparing each other (except to help each other out, nicely)… it was some people in the audience. It’s absolutely natural and inevitable! But there was one particular set of …

Simon talking about presenting and where the camera feels like it goes

two podcast interviews about presentations

Well, while I finally get my act together about to relaunch the (upcoming) “HaveMoreImpact” podcast, I’ve been busy on other people’s 🙂 By co-incidence both came out in the same week. First up is Paul Lancaster’s one-hour long (!) interview for his SuperConnector podcast. We cover presentations of course, but also Batman and the Benny …

Finishing the presentation playing a cajon

How I made a rocking conference presentation

I recently closed Andrew & Pete‘s first Atomic-X conference – it’s a mini-conference leading into a Christmas party. Any why the hell not, eh? Before I go into detail of how I did it and how the presentation went, you need to know the stakes. Andrew & Pete run Atomic, a marketing-and-business-development community that I’m …

why appearances matter in presentations

Appearances in presentations matter because of the Oppenheimer Effect. I’ve known of the Oppenheimer Effect for years – partially as a social phenomenon and partially from personal experience. When I was a researcher I was the best there was at what I did. (Don’t get too excited about that: after over two decades as a …

desperate things to do in boring presentations

How to give feedback about a presentation

As Saturday, June 1st is officially #SaySomethingNiceDay, I thought it might be “interesting” to research (and blog about!) something I’ve personally always found difficult – how to give feedback on a presentation. As that’s a significant part of my work as a presentations trainer, it’s something I’ve done a lot of, but I’m not really …